Monday, December 1, 2014

Why We Fight: Patricia Alcivar


Photo by Upset Specialist Photography





















Patricia Alcivar

Weight Division: Flyweight/Super Flyweight (110-116 lbs.)
Amateur Record: 30 wins, 5 losses, 4 knockouts
Professional Record: 7 wins, 3 losses, 3 knockouts
Amateur Titles and Awards:
2-Time NYC Golden Gloves Champion 
USA Boxing Womens National Champion
1st Female ever to be named "Athlete of the Year" voted by the USA Boxing Olympic Committee
Western States Champion
NY MetroGames & Empire Games Champion 
Professional Title:
Current NYS Flyweight Champion


Photo by Patrica Alcivar

When and why did you start boxing? 
I Started boxing in the Summer of 1996. I was living by myself in NYC and found my first real office job at Sanctuary for Families (a not for profit city funded battered women's comprehensive agency that provided shelter, counseling and legal services). The New School offered the staff free courses, so after flipping through the pages "The Art of Boxing" jumped out at me. I signed up and was crazy disappointed when it turned out to be a boxaerobics class. You see, I was diagnosed with a mild case of ADD when I was about 8 yearrs old. The counselor suggested to my mom that I participate in some activity to drain the excess energy. My mom put me in a free ballet course sponsored by her work and it helped. Ballet turned into gymnastics and then into Martial arts. The more intense, the more I excelled. I won a World Championship in the Ladies open Division in full contact Kyokushin Karate. I was looking for my next challenge at the time that I signed up for boxing classes. I waited for the last class of the course and waited to speak to the instructor. I told him I was disappointed and had hoped it was a real boxing class. So he asked me to throw a few punches. And while I did that, I punched him with all that I had in the mid section. The 6'5", 225 lb former amateur boxer instructor bent over as I literally took his breath away. He said, "You know, female boxing just became legal in NYC, so I can train you to fight." I entered my first tournament that year. Boxing has been the sport that keeps challenging me in every way!

What do you love about boxing? 
I love that boxing is much more than a physical challenge. In order to excel you must be mentally and physically prepared.

What is the most challenging thing about boxing? 
As a female professional boxer, the most challenging thing has been trying to keep my integrity while trying to get a fair opportunity to box.

Do you ever experience negativity from other people because of your choice to be a boxer? How do you deal with it? 
The negativity, stereotyping and comments have been there ever since I started boxing. Comments like "You are too pretty to box," or "Why would you want to get punched in the face and ruin yourself?" are the typical mentality/comments. I take it as an opportunity to educate and use my story as motivation. It's not easy at times, but I have always known what makes me happy and that is my comfort.

What is the biggest affect boxing has had on your life? 
Boxing has taught me to believe in myself when no one did and to not give up, even when everything seems to be going wrong. Boxing continues to teach me life lessons about people and myself.

What is the most important life lesson you've learned from boxing? 
To "Face My Fears and Live My Dreams". And when I think I can't, I must!